An Ordinary Day


 

He was a great family man, a mentor, a father,

shot and killed by a fugitive he tried to arrest,

a man wanted for attempting to kill police officers

and for domestic violence.

He was a great family man, 53,

Trying to do his job.

 

Men in blue, grim, walk side by side past

flashing lights of squad cars, arrived too late.

One shakes his head, how easily it could have been him.

 

The yellow tape stretched now, from tree to tree,

marks off part of a world that will never see again

the family man, the mentor, the father.

Do not cross, do not cross, it says, do not cross,

as if we, who stand here, might want to pick a fight.

 

An ATF agent reconstructs how it went down.

The crime scene lady with her trim briefcase

steps resolutely forward, ready to do her job.

Voices, fighting tears, ask in whispers,

have they notified his wife?

 

The tape sways in the breeze.

Advertisements

About brucejberger

Bruce J. Berger has published his short fiction in a variety of print and on-line literary journals, including Prole, Jersey Devil Press Anthology, The Awakenings Review, Raphael's Village, Eastown Fiction, Black Magnolias Literary Journal, and others. He also publishes shorts stories for Amazon's Kindle. He is pursuing his MFA in Creative Writing at American University beginning in August 2015.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to An Ordinary Day

  1. caroliviah says:

    Thank you, Bruce. This is a poignant poem, I think the last stanza could even be stretched out a little longer . . . something what I put below . . . I guess I’d just like the ending to last a little longer.

    The tape
    An ATF agent reconstructs how it went down.
    The crime scene lady with her trim briefcase
    steps resolutely forward, ready to do her job.
    The tape sways
    Voices, fighting tears, ask in whispers,
    The tape sways in the breeze.
    have they notified his wife?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s